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How does Crop Scouting with Drones Work?

Crop scouting is a vital part of modern farming that is being revolutionized by drone technology. Crop scouting allows farmers to identify and address issues that could negatively impact their crop yields. Traditionally, this has been done by walking the fields and manually inspecting the plants. Drones provide farmers with a more

efficient and accurate way to monitor their crops.


One of the main benefits of using drones for crop scouting is the ability to cover more ground in a shorter amount of time. Rather than walking the fields, farmers can fly a drone over the entire field, getting a bird's-eye view of the crop. This allows them to quickly identify any issues that may be present, such as pests, disease, or uneven growth.


Another benefit of drone crop scouting is the ability to capture high-resolution images and videos of the crops. These images can be analyzed to detect issues that may not be visible to the naked eye, such as nutrient deficiencies or water stress. This allows farmers to make more informed decisions about how to care for their crops, improving yields and reducing the risk of crop loss.


In addition to identifying issues, drones can also be used to monitor crop growth and development. By capturing regular images and videos of the crop, farmers can track changes over time and make adjustments as needed. This can help optimize crop yields and reduce the need for costly inputs, such as fertilizers and pesticides.


Furthermore, drones can also be used to map the field, providing farmers with a detailed view of the terrain and crop distribution. This can help farmers plan their planting, harvesting and irrigation schedules, as well as identify areas that may be more susceptible to disease or pests.


Another benefit of using drones for crop scouting is the ability to access hard-to-reach areas. Drones can easily fly over fields that may be difficult to access on foot, such as sloping or hilly terrain. This can be especially beneficial for farmers who have large or sprawling fields, making it more convenient to inspect the entire field.


At Aero Ag we use AGREMO and PIX4D Fields software for detailed crop analysis. These tools give us a great combination of multispectral mapping, zonation and spot spray mapping, and Artificial Intelligence powered analysis tools. We know the right tool to use for the job. Let us show you how we can help with a free demo!






Do drones make crop yield estimation easier?


Yes, drones can help farmers make better estimates of crop yields. By using drones to capture high-resolution images and videos of the crops, farmers can analyze the crop canopy, plant count, and plant spacing. This can provide farmers with a more accurate estimate of crop yields, as they can better understand the density and health of the crop.


Additionally, drones can also be equipped with sensors that can measure various crop-related parameters, such as chlorophyll content, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), and LAI (Leaf Area Index). These measurements can be used to estimate crop growth and yield, as well as identify issues such as nutrient deficiencies or water stress.


Multispectral Imaging



Multispectral maps, which are created by using multispectral cameras mounted on drones, can help farmers predict crop performance by providing detailed information about the health and growth of their crops. These maps can be used to identify issues such as nutrient deficiencies, water stress, and disease, allowing farmers to take action before these issues lead to a reduction in crop yield.


Multispectral maps help farmers predict crop performance is by providing information about the crop's chlorophyll content, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), and LAI (Leaf Area Index). These measurements can be used to estimate crop growth and yield, as well as identify issues such as nutrient deficiencies or water stress. By identifying these issues early, farmers can take action to correct them, improving crop performance and yield.


Additionally, multispectral maps can also be used to identify areas of the field that may be more susceptible to disease or pests, allowing farmers to take preventative measures. This can help farmers optimize crop yields and reduce the risk of crop loss.

What drones are good for crop scouting?


The type of drone that is best for crop scouting depends on the specific needs of the farmer. However, some features and capabilities that are important to consider when selecting a drone for crop scouting include:


Camera: A high-resolution camera is essential for crop scouting. Drones with multispectral cameras can capture detailed images and videos of the crops, providing farmers with a bird's-eye view of the crop canopy, plant count, and plant spacing.


Flight Time: A drone with a long flight time will allow farmers to cover more ground in a shorter amount of time. This is especially important for farmers with large fields or multiple fields.


Sensors: Some drones come equipped with sensors that can measure various crop-related parameters, such as chlorophyll content, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), and LAI (Leaf Area Index). These measurements can be used to estimate crop growth and yield, as well as identify issues such as nutrient deficiencies or water stress.


Autonomous Flight: Autonomous flight capabilities allow the drone to fly pre-programmed flight paths, making crop scouting more efficient and reducing the need for manual piloting.


GPS: GPS is useful for mapping the field and providing farmers with a detailed view of the terrain and crop distribution.


Size and Weight: Drones with a smaller size and weight are more portable and easier to transport, making them more convenient for farmers to use.


Some examples of drones that are often used for crop scouting are Mavic 3M, Phantom 4 multispectral, and DJI Matrice 300 (with a multispectral sensor added). These drones come equipped with advanced features, high-resolution cameras, and long flight times, making them ideal for crop scouting.





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